A- A A+

The Balfour declaration: Britain broke its feeble promise to the Palestinians

Jonathan Cook |  29 November 2017

There is more than a little irony in Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s decision to attend a “celebration” dinner this week in London with his British counterpart, Theresa May, marking the centenary of the Balfour Declaration.


Palestinian objections to the 1917 document are well-known. Britain’s Lord Balfour had no right to promise a “national home for the Jewish people” in Palestine, on the land of another people, writes Jonathan Cook for the Palestine Chronicle.

 


Similar articles

A call for Australia to agree on a fair and just boundary with Timor-Leste

 | 30 November 2017

For more than a decade, Australia has treated Timor with disdain. 


How Israel engages in “water apartheid”

Mersiha Gadzo  | 30 November 2017

"The level of unrestricted access to water enjoyed by those residing in Israel and Israeli settlers demonstrates that resources are plentiful, and that the lack of sufficient water for Palestinians is a direct result of Israel's discriminatory policies in water management,” says a 2013 report Water for one people only quoted in Mersiha Gadzo’s article for Al Jazeera.


Balfour another colonial distortion of history

Stuart Rees | 30 November 2017

The 100-year anniversary of one of Great Britain’s great betrayals is upon us this month, writes Professor Stuart Rees for New Matilda. 


The mess we are in: Trump trauma set up by Bush

Don Hazen | 31 August 2017

United States public intellectual and foundation executive Colin Greer reminds us that former president George W. Bush created intense trauma for Americans before the current president Donald Trump arrived.


Millennials rapidly losing interest in democracy

Keith Breene | 31 October 2017

Not long ago, liberal democracy was regarded by many as not just the best form of government, but the inevitable form of government. At the end of the Cold War, Francis Fukuyama famously called the end of history: democracy had won, everything else had failed. In 2017, that view looks naive. New research warns that democracy’s fan base is shrinking, especially among younger people.