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Martin Luther on today’s refugee and migrant crises

Leopoldo A. Sánchez M. |  29 November 2017

According to the United Nations, more than 65 million people (23 million of them refugees) are counted as forcibly displaced due to persecution, war and violence. That is about as many people as the population of New York state, Texas and Florida.

More than half are children under the age of 18. Only 1 percent get resettled each year. The numbers are staggering. For years, the United States has been a world leader in refugee resettlement. Yet to the dismay of refugee resettlement agencies and many citizens, President Trump recently lowered the cap on refugee admissions to 45,000—the lowest in decades—and we keep hearing of indefinite travel bans to the United States for travelers from various countries.

 


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